Congratulations Victor Gallegos, RVT

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EL SEGUNDO ANIMAL HOSPITAL

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Congratulations Victor Gallegos, RVT

One of our outstanding team…VICOTOR by CORAL ZUMWALT

On behalf of the staff of the El Segundo Animal Hospital, I wish to congratulate ESAH’s Victor Gallegos for passing his national Registered Veterinary Technician boards.  He passed both the California State exam and National boards on his first attempt.

Victor’s accomplishment comes nearly three years after joining the staff at El Segundo Animal Hospital.  He was one of the five original members to open ESAH, and has since then worked full-time, all while getting married, raising two sons and purchasing his first home.

He is a credit to his profession and possesses a broad practical clinical knowledge base with an excellent aptitude for the intricate, physical demands of his position.

I am exceptionally proud of Victor and his accomplishment, and wish him continued success as he expands his role at ESAH, taking on even more and greater responsibilities.

Andrew M. Streiber, DVM

The Seen:

“Hollywood Cats” at the Hammer Museum bookstore, Los Angeles…

HAMMER MUSEUM

Catcerto

Dog Feats

A great article from the N.Y. Times about canine brain power

by DOUG MAGNUSON

by DAVID HOCHMAN

Not to brag, but we may have a little genius on our hands. Our 6-month-old is up before dawn playing brain games. She knows her way around an iPad and practically devours puzzles, and I’m teaching her to read. Just recently, she mastered an advanced chess toy.

I am talking, of course, about our dog.

Let me rewind a moment. The last time I had a puppy, I was 9 years old. This might as well have been in the Mesozoic era, since life with a dog was so primitive then. If Buck was good, he got Gaines-Burgers and maybe a Milk-Bone. Bad, we’d deliver stern admonitions over the half-eaten sneaker. But within hours of adopting our fuzzy, adorable Pi, I sensed that being a pet parent today — nobody uses the word “owner” anymore, apparently — means cultivating intelligence, manners and communication skills the way the parent of, say, a small human might.

Our canine compadres no longer eat from mere bowls. Now there are interactive feeding products like Dog Twister (imported from Sweden, no less, for around $50), with rotating hidden compartments that make dogs reason their way to kibble. Another, called Slo-Bowl, pays homage to the artisanal food movement, with “nature-inspired” rubber curves and ridges that keep dogs “foraging for every bite,” the company’s website says ($20). A doggy tick-tack-toe puzzle from Petco encourages “problem solving” and increases “eye-paw-mouth coordination,” for $17. Smartphone apps like App for Dog, iSqueek and Answers: YesNo let puppies doodle, nuzzle virtual chewies and even recognize a few simple words. Others help them take selfies. Then there is the spreading quantified dog movement: A San Francisco company called Whistle Labs makes a wearable activity monitor — a Fido Fitbit, basically, for $129 — that tracks a dog’s every sit, stay and roll over.

Needless to say, I bought it all. My wife and I were already micromanaging our son’s schoolwork, food intake, extracurricular activities and playdates; why not helicopter Pi to the far limits of her breed? Which, come to think of it, meant figuring out what breed she was in the first place: Mutt doesn’t quite cut it these days. For $70, the scientists behind Wisdom Panel 2.0 will “uncover DNA-based insights that may help you understand your dog’s unique appearance, behaviors and wellness needs,” according to the package. Two awkward cheek swabs later (“I’ll hold her head, you twirl the Q-tip thingee,” my wife said), we were a lab test away from knowing Pi’s pedigree down to eight great-grandparents.

A new dog is nothing if not a mystery shrouded in fur. What exactly was lurking behind Pi’s smoky eyes? Would she be a charmer, a rocket scientist or a bumbling, tail-chasing dolt? For answers, I turned to Brian Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist who studies behavior at the Canine Cognition Center at Duke. Last year, he started Dognition, a web-based testing service that charges $29 and up for a series of rigorous at-home video experiments to evaluate your dog’s cognitive skills. The results are fed into a database with tens of thousands of dogs to determine one of nine personality types: “socialite,” “maverick,” “renaissance dog” and so on.

the article continues here…

(NY TIMES  4.11.14)

Pets in Literature:

Set in a hard-boiled pet-noir world of cats and dogs, “The Unscratchables” by Cornelius Kane spins the yarn of homicide detective Max “Crusher” McNab, a bull terrier who teams with siamese cat Cassius Lap, an agent working for the Feline Bureau of Investigation.  Their goal, find the serial killer cat that’s targeting dogs…UNCRATCHABLES 1from KIRKUS

Pseudonymous Kane’s debut shows what happens when the guardians of the mean streets are a bull terrier and a Siamese cat.

Whatever has become of all the humans absent from Det. Max (Crusher) McNash’s world, they’ve certainly left their mark. Crusher, divorced by the wife who thought he was doing a lousy job of raising their five pups, wears clothing, frequents bars, appreciates attractive pooches and treasures a night at the boxing arena watching feral Zeus Katsopoulos challenge Rocky Cerberus. By the time he gets to see this fateful match, however, Crusher is already paw-deep in pursuit of a serial killer, a cat of preternatural size and power who’s terrorizing dogs across the city. When Crusher’s best witness, Flasha Lightning, not only refuses to say anything specific but keeps running away, Chief Kaiser Kessler calls in Cassius Lap of the Feline Bureau of Investigation. Like the salt-and-pepper rapport of the suavely manipulative Siamese and the blunt bull terrier, innumerable details of plot, setting and characterization evoke a fictional universe in which cops and criminals aren’t exactly cats and dogs but aren’t exactly people either.

UNSCRATCHABLES 2the review continues here…

(KIRKUS)

Pet Spotlight: March

WYLIE!

WYLIE

Five year-old Wylie is a 49 pound Wheaton Terrier from Manhattan Beach.

Pet Toxins

March is National Pet Poison Prevention Month…

from ASPCA

In 2013, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, Illinois, handled nearly 180,000 cases about pets exposed to possibly poisonous substances. Topping the list for the sixth year in a row are prescription human medications. Nearly 20% of all calls were from owners whose pets got into medicines intended for human use.

Here are the top 10 toxins of 2013 ranked in order of call volume:

1. Prescription Human Medications

The APCC handled 24,673 cases regarding human prescription medications in 2013. The top three types of medications that animals were exposed to include: heart medications (blood pressure pills), antidepressants and pain medications (opioids and prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Many of these exposures were due to people dropping their medication when preparing to take it, and before they knew it, Fido had gobbled the pill off the floor.

2. Insecticides

Insecticides are used in the yard, home and on our animals. While 15.7% of all calls to the APCC are about insecticides, more than half of the calls involving cats pertain to felines exposed to insecticides. Always read the label before using any insecticide on your pet, in your home or in your yard.

3. Over-the-Counter Human Medications

Over-the-counter human products accounted for 14.7% of calls to APCC in 2013. This group contains acetaminophen, ibuprofen and naproxen as well as herbal and nutraceutical products (fish oil, joint supplements). Many of these products are tasty to pets, and some can be life threatening if ingested.

the list continues here…

(ASPCA)

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